CoursesCivil Dialogue Seminar: Civic Engagement in a Divided Nation
URBS 245/EDUC 244/COMM 244

Civil Dialogue Seminar: Civic Engagement in a Divided Nation

The goal of this course is to help students develop concepts, tools, dispositions and skills that will help them engage productively in the ongoing experiment of American democracy. Civil dialogue is an aspiration, a theory and a practice—and one of the most misunderstood terms in contemporary political life.

Tues., 12:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Our goal is for you to learn concepts, tools, dispositions and skills that will help you engage more effectively in the ongoing experiment of American democracy. These will also equip you to hold more productive conversations with family, on campus, online and at work.

This is an experiential seminar driven by discussions about issues that matter to you and by exercises where you and your classmates will test out the concepts you are learning. The seminar will integrate wellness concepts and exercises.

Your capstone project will allow you to design a civic dialogue around an issue that you care about. If you want to try to carry out your capstone idea in the real world, you can apply for money and help to do that through the Red and Blue Exchange, a Paideia program.

Working Syllabus

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