CoursesSeminar in Positive Psychology: Positive Education
PSYC 466 (301 and 302)

Seminar in Positive Psychology: Positive Education

This seminar will synthesize research about preserving and promoting well-being amongst students, while they simultaneously pursue traditional educational outcomes. Positive Psychology is an upper-level seminar.

Wednesdays, 10:15 AM – 1:15 PM (301) & Wednesdays, 1:45 PM – 4:45 PM (302)

The goals of the course are for you to explore the ideas and research of positive psychology. The activities of the course foster this, and engage you with the material via our major projects. All assessment is meaningfully connected to our course goals. The assessment is also valuable in its own right. Drafting a petition concerning something you are knowledgeable about, sharing ideas with young students that can benefit them, and articulating the evidence-based merits of positive education are all worthwhile activities, even without your associated grade.

Working Syllabus

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