EngagePerspectivesBlogStatement from The Task Force on Support to Asian and Asian-American Students and Scholars (TAASS)

Statement from The Task Force on Support to Asian and Asian-American Students and Scholars (TAASS)

In April of 2020, The University of Pennsylvania established the Task Force on Support to Asian and Asian-American Students and Scholars (TAASS) to coordinate and enhance support to members of the Penn community experiencing increased stigma, bias, discrimination, and violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Task Force, now convened by the Office of Social Equity and Community, is charged with identifying recommendations to the University to better serve Asian and Asian American experiences moving forward. The Task Force is led by Vice President for Social Equity & Community and University Chaplain Rev. Dr. Charles Howard and Vice Provost for University Life Dr. Mamta Accapadi. Membership includes faculty, staff, and undergraduate and graduate students including representatives from the Undergraduate Assembly (UA) and the Graduate & Professional Student Assembly (GAPSA).

Recent racist comments made by a member of the faculty in our university’s Law School have caused hurt and harm in the community.  Dean Ruger’s response and organizing efforts by students remind us that racist comments and perpetuation of harmful stereotypes do not reflect the values of our broader community. The Task Force joins the University and community members in condemning hateful speech. These events underscore the continued need for the University to identify and demonstrate commitment to meeting the needs of Asian and Asian American students, scholars, and community members as well as other targeted and structurally marginalized communities. The Task Force invites the Penn community to share perspectives on what resources and supports would better serve to uplift and improve Asian and Asian American experiences in both the short and long term.  Contact the task force through the Office of Social Equity and Community

For those interested in connecting with current programs and initiatives, we encourage you to get involved with one or more of the following:

  • The Asian American Studies Program (ASAM) is an interdisciplinary program celebrating 25 years at the University. It offers a Minor and a broad range of courses and activities that explore the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian immigrants and of persons of Asian ancestry in North America. Through core courses in Sociology, English, and History, the program explores questions of race and ethnicity in national and global contexts.  Students may complete the ASAM minor alongside a multitude of majors.
  • The Pan-Asian American Community House (PAACH) is a community resource center that develops and implements innovative programs for leadership development and community building (& service) in close collaboration with Asian & Asian American student and community groups.
  • Penn Global is comprised of the Office of the Vice Provost for Global Initiatives, Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, Perry World House, Penn Abroad, International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS), Global Support Services, and Penn Global Finance and Administration.
  • The Pan-Asian Faculty & Staff Association (PAFSA) serves as a space for our community of Asian/Asian American-identifying staff and faculty to share ideas, knowledge, and connections. PAFSA provides networking, and professional development opportunities throughout the year. For more information and to join the network, please contact PAFSA facilitators, Aman Kaur at amankaur@pobox.upenn.edu and Ryan Viillanueva at ryanv@upenn.edu.

For community members who have experienced harm, bias incidents or need support:

  • Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Office of the Chaplain
  • Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for University Faculty and Staff
  • Pan-Asian American Community House (PAACH)
  • Or you can Report a bias related incident

Keep Reading

Op-Ed

The Force of the Weaker Argument

I suppose we’re bound to see things this way. But we can view our opponents’ arguments as weaker than our own without dismissing them… Learn More
headshot of David French
Event Recap

Conservative Writer David French Gives his Perspective on Political Division in the United States

The most politically engaged Americans are becoming “dangerously polarized,” even as the “exhausted majority” of Americans opt out of political discussion altogether, writer David French told a Penn audience recently in a Zoom event sponsored by the Red and Blue Exchange (RBX).Learn More
Bettina L. Love
Blog

Abolitionist Teaching and Learning with Bettina L. Love

In We Want to Do More than Survive, Love argues for a pedagogy that actively works towards radically restructuring and reimagining the prevailing educational model in the U.S. This pedagogy, which Love calls “abolitionist teaching,” is devoted to intersectional racial justice in and beyond the classroom through civics education, community coalition building, and critical theory. She refers to recent high-profile events and activism related to racial injustice; academic research in education; abolitionist histories; critical theory; and her own experiences as a Black, queer, female student and educator to make this argument.Learn More