CoursesThe Future of Conservatism and the GOP
PSCI 398-303

The Future of Conservatism and the GOP

This course — the first Penn in Washington course to be delivered on campus — will give students the opportunity to explore both the roots and the evolution of conservative thought by engaging with readings and directly with the prominent leaders on the right.

Fridays 3:30 PM – 6:30 PM

In addition to faculty, a range of guest speakers will be invited to join discussions. Students will explore their own political philosophy and compare and contrast this with the core principles of a principled conservative viewpoint, and may be surprised to find more commonalities than differences. Example assignments include the development of a platform for a reformed Republican Party or new party that rises on the right to challenge it. Students may also construct policy proposals on some of our most pressing problems using the conservative principles they study and develop. Acquiring cognitive empathy by engaging with thoughtful scholars and practitioners and developing solutions from a perspective that they might not share builds useful muscles, both for practical career purposes and for personal growth.

Example Syllabus [PDF]

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HIST 164-001

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Instructor(s)

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Semester

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