CoursesParticipatory Cities
URBS 3140 / SOCI 2960

Participatory Cities

What is a participatory city? What has that term meant in the past, what does it mean now, and what will it mean going forward? Against the backdrop of increasing inequality and inequity, and the rise in a search for solutions, what role can citizens play in co-creating more just cities and neighborhoods? How can citizens be engaged in the decision making processes about the places where we live, work, and play? And most importantly, how can we work to make sure that all kinds of voices are meaningfully included, and that historically muted voices are elevated to help pave a better path forward?

Designated as an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course.

Tuesdays, 5:15 PM – 8:14 PM

This course will connect theory with praxis as we explore together history, challenges, methods, and approaches, and impact of community participation and stakeholder involvement in cities.

Sample Syllabus

An Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) Course

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