CoursesFellows Proseminar I
COMM 025

Fellows Proseminar I

The SNF Paideia Fellows Proseminar I introduces sophomore Fellows to academic research and practice related to dialogue across difference. The course also explores the relationship between robust, civil dialogue and citizenship, wellness, and service. We engage diverse perspectives on the purpose of higher education, the role of dialogue in learning and communities, the nature of citizenship, the value of civility, and the relationship between individual and community wellness.

Wednesday, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

To help cultivate a sense of belonging and connection to Penn, the course invites several guest lecturers from entities at Penn to share how they foster citizenship, service, wellness or dialogue into our community. Students will identify the ways in which their academic, professional and personal interests in these themes could align and then develop a strategy to cultivate and apply these interests during their time at Penn and to the benefit of the Penn community. The goal of the course is to equip students with the knowledge, skills, experiences, and ethical frameworks for healthy, sustainable and robust civic leadership at Penn and in their local, national, and global communities. This course is open only to SNF Paideia Fellows, who are required to take it during the fall of their sophomore year.

Other Courses of Interest

PSYC 466 (301 and 302)

Seminar in Positive Psychology: Positive Education

Instructor(s)

  • Caroline Connolly

Semester

Fall 2021

This seminar will synthesize research about preserving and promoting well-being amongst students, while they simultaneously pursue traditional educational outcomes. Positive Psychology is an upper-level seminar.

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HIST 164-001

American Monuments: Designs for the Future

Instructor(s)

  • Jared Farmer

Semester

Fall 2021

The 2020 protests about monuments in Philadelphia and across the nation have exposed this truth: Arguments over the past are arguments about the future. This place-based course examines local and national public memory in relation to the built environment. Students will learn about the making of the U.S. memorial landscape in the long nineteenth century, its remaking in the twentieth century, and its possible futures in the (un)making.

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