CoursesGrit Lab: Fostering Passion and Perseverance
PSYC 005/OIDD 005

Grit Lab: Fostering Passion and Perseverance

Are you interested in the science and practice of passion and perseverance? The aims of Grit Lab are two-fold: (1) to equip you with generalizable knowledge about the science of passion and perseverance, and (2) to help you apply these insights to your own life. Enrollment is now closed.

Fridays, 12 PM – 2:30 PM

At the heart of this course are cutting-edge scientific discoveries about how to foster passion and perseverance for long-term goals. As in any undergraduate course, you will have an opportunity to learn from current research. But unlike most courses, Grit Lab encourages you to apply these ideas to your own life and reflect on your experience. This is a full 1.0 CU class that is mandatory Pass/Fail (so no letter grades) that will take place synchronously.

Professor Angela Duckworth is thrilled to be offering Grit Lab during the spring 2021 semester to both current Penn undergraduates of all schools as well as students in the Penn LPS Young Scholars Program. Enrollment requires an additional and separate application from the Young Scholars Program.

Online Application Due DEC 2

Example Syllabus

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